Les actualités

Rebellion and Repression in China, 1966-1969

Séance spéciale de séminaire - Vendredi 08 juin 2018 - 10:00Conférence d'Andrew Walder (Stanford University), directeur d’études invité à l’EHESS par Sebastian Veg (CCJ-CECMC), dans le cadre du séminaire d'Isabelle Thireau, « Enquêtes et regards des sociologues chinois sur le monde chinois ».Andrew Walder est titulaire de la chaire Denise O’Leary & Kent Thiry au département de sociologie de Stanford. Un des meilleurs spécialistes du maoïsme et de la Révolution culturelle, il a consacré plusieurs ouvrages et articles importants à celle-ci et notamment aux conflits entre Gardes rouges (Fractured Rebellion: The Beijing Red Guard Movement, Harvard, 2009). Plus récemment, il a publié un ouvrage synthétique proposant un bilan de l’expérience maoïste (China Under Mao: A Revolution Derailed, Harvard, 2015).RésuméIn the first four years after the onset of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, one of the largest political upheavals of the 20th century paralyzed a highly centralized party state, leading to a harsh regime of military control. Despite a wave of post-Mao revelations in the 1980s, knowledge about the nationwide impact of this insurgency and its suppression remains selective and impressionistic, based primarily on a handful of local accounts. Employing a dataset drawn from historical narratives published in 2,213 county and city annals, this article charts the temporal and geographic spread of a mass insurgency, its evolution through time, and the repression through which militarized state structures were rebuilt. Comparisons of published figures with internal investigation reports, and statistical estimates from sample selection models, yield an estimate of close to 1.6 million deaths and 30 million direct victims of some form of political persecution. The vast majority of casualties were due to repression by authorities, not the actions of insurgents. Despite the large overall death toll, per capita death rates were considerably lower than a range of comparable cases, including the Soviet purges at the height of Stalinist terror in the late 1930s.

Lire la suite

Mao and the Mao Era

Séance spéciale de séminaire - Lundi 18 juin 2018 - 17:00Conférence d'Andrew Walder (Stanford University), directeur d’études invité à l’EHESS, dans le cadre du séminaire central du CERCEC, « 1918-2018. Mondes russe, caucasien, centre-asiatique et centre-européen : sources et méthodes. Fronts et frontières d'Empire ».Andrew Walder est titulaire de la chaire Denise O’Leary & Kent Thiry au département de sociologie de Stanford. Un des meilleurs spécialistes du maoïsme et de la Révolution culturelle, il a consacré plusieurs ouvrages et articles importants à celle-ci et notamment aux conflits entre Gardes rouges (Fractured Rebellion: The Beijing Red Guard Movement, Harvard, 2009). Plus récemment, il a publié un ouvrage synthétique proposant un bilan de l’expérience maoïste (China Under Mao: A Revolution Derailed, Harvard, 2015).RésuméAs the Mao era, and in particular the Cultural Revolution fade in memory, its history has fallen out of focus and has been infused with myth. Drawing on his recent book, China Under Mao: A Revolution Derailed (Harvard 2015), Walder will take up two related questions. First, what were Mao’s intentions and what were the actual outcomes of his radical initiatives? Second, why did these outcomes occur? Mao emerges from the historical record as a revolutionary whose radicalism was undiminished by the passage of time. His initiatives frequently had consequences that he had not intended and that frustrated his designs. Despite creating China’s first unified modern national state and initiating its industrialization drive, Mao left China divided, backward, and weak.

Lire la suite

Mao and the Mao Era

Séance spéciale de séminaire - Lundi 18 juin 2018 - 17:00Conférence d'Andrew Walder (Stanford University), directeur d’études invité à l’EHESS, dans le cadre du séminaire central du CERCEC, « 1918-2018. Mondes russe, caucasien, centre-asiatique et centre-européen : sources et méthodes. Fronts et frontières d'Empire ».Andrew Walder est titulaire de la chaire Denise O’Leary & Kent Thiry au département de sociologie de Stanford. Un des meilleurs spécialistes du maoïsme et de la Révolution culturelle, il a consacré plusieurs ouvrages et articles importants à celle-ci et notamment aux conflits entre Gardes rouges (Fractured Rebellion: The Beijing Red Guard Movement, Harvard, 2009). Plus récemment, il a publié un ouvrage synthétique proposant un bilan de l’expérience maoïste (China Under Mao: A Revolution Derailed, Harvard, 2015).RésuméAs the Mao era, and in particular the Cultural Revolution fade in memory, its history has fallen out of focus and has been infused with myth. Drawing on his recent book, China Under Mao: A Revolution Derailed (Harvard 2015), Walder will take up two related questions. First, what were Mao’s intentions and what were the actual outcomes of his radical initiatives? Second, why did these outcomes occur? Mao emerges from the historical record as a revolutionary whose radicalism was undiminished by the passage of time. His initiatives frequently had consequences that he had not intended and that frustrated his designs. Despite creating China’s first unified modern national state and initiating its industrialization drive, Mao left China divided, backward, and weak.

Lire la suite

Rebellion and Repression in China, 1966-1969

Séance spéciale de séminaire - Vendredi 08 juin 2018 - 10:00Conférence d'Andrew Walder (Stanford University), directeur d’études invité à l’EHESS par Sebastian Veg (CCJ-CECMC), dans le cadre du séminaire d'Isabelle Thireau, « Enquêtes et regards des sociologues chinois sur le monde chinois ».Andrew Walder est titulaire de la chaire Denise O’Leary & Kent Thiry au département de sociologie de Stanford. Un des meilleurs spécialistes du maoïsme et de la Révolution culturelle, il a consacré plusieurs ouvrages et articles importants à celle-ci et notamment aux conflits entre Gardes rouges (Fractured Rebellion: The Beijing Red Guard Movement, Harvard, 2009). Plus récemment, il a publié un ouvrage synthétique proposant un bilan de l’expérience maoïste (China Under Mao: A Revolution Derailed, Harvard, 2015).RésuméIn the first four years after the onset of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, one of the largest political upheavals of the 20th century paralyzed a highly centralized party state, leading to a harsh regime of military control. Despite a wave of post-Mao revelations in the 1980s, knowledge about the nationwide impact of this insurgency and its suppression remains selective and impressionistic, based primarily on a handful of local accounts. Employing a dataset drawn from historical narratives published in 2,213 county and city annals, this article charts the temporal and geographic spread of a mass insurgency, its evolution through time, and the repression through which militarized state structures were rebuilt. Comparisons of published figures with internal investigation reports, and statistical estimates from sample selection models, yield an estimate of close to 1.6 million deaths and 30 million direct victims of some form of political persecution. The vast majority of casualties were due to repression by authorities, not the actions of insurgents. Despite the large overall death toll, per capita death rates were considerably lower than a range of comparable cases, including the Soviet purges at the height of Stalinist terror in the late 1930s.

Lire la suite

China’s Historical Trajectory

Séance spéciale de séminaire - Mercredi 30 mai 2018 - 11:00Conférence d'Andrew Walder (Stanford University), directeur d’études invité à l’EHESS, dans le cadre du séminaire de Sebastian Veg, « Historiography of Maoism: new interpretations ».Andrew Walder est titulaire de la chaire Denise O’Leary & Kent Thiry au département de sociologie de Stanford. Un des meilleurs spécialistes du maoïsme et de la Révolution culturelle, il a consacré plusieurs ouvrages et articles importants à celle-ci et notamment aux conflits entre Gardes rouges (Fractured Rebellion: The Beijing Red Guard Movement, Harvard, 2009). Plus récemment, il a publié un ouvrage synthétique proposant un bilan de l’expérience maoïste (China Under Mao: A Revolution Derailed, Harvard, 2015).RésuméContrary to its initiators’ intentions, the Cultural Revolution laid political foundations for a transition to a market-oriented economy, while also creating circumstances that helped ensure the cohesion and survival of China’s Soviet-style party-state. The Cultural Revolution left the Communist Party and civilian state structures weak and in flux, and drastically weakened entrenched bureaucratic interests that might have blocked market reform. The weakening of central government structures created a decentralized planned economy whose regional and local leaders were receptive to initial market-oriented opportunities. The economic and technological backwardness fostered by the Cultural Revolution left little support for maintaining status quo. Mao put Deng Xiaoping in charge of rebuilding the party and economy briefly in the mid-1970s before purging him a second time, inadvertently making him the standard-bearer for post-Mao rebuilding and recovery. Mutual animosities with the Soviet Union provoked by Maoist polemics led to a surprising strategic turn to the United States and other western countries in the early 1970s, which subsequently advanced the agenda of reform and opening. The impact of this legacy becomes especially clear when contrasted with the Soviet Union in the 1980s, where circumstances were very different, and where Gorbachev’s attempts to implement similar changes in the face of entrenched bureaucratic interests led to the collapse and dismemberment of the Soviet state.

Lire la suite

Use of capital in sea-faring activities in the 16th-18th century China

Séance spéciale de séminaire - Mercredi 02 mai 2018 - 11:00Invité par l’Ecole française d'Extrême-Orient (Paola Calanca), le Professeur Chen Kuo-tung 陳國棟 (Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica, Taïwan) donnera une conférence dans le cadre du séminaire de François Gipouloux et Aleksandra Kobiljski, Aux origines de la mondialisation et de la divergence Europe-Asie.Sa conférence s'intitule : “Use of capital in sea-faring activities in the 16th-18th century China".Elle aura lieu Mercredi 2 mai 2018, de 11h à 13h à l'EHESS (salle 07-51), 54 bd Raspail 75006 Paris. AbstractSea-faring activities are full of risks and uncertainty.  Building and operating a Chinese ship (junk) also cost a lot of money.  In order to raise large amount of capital or to reduce their own risk, several methods were adopted by the people working in the line of sea-faring business.  I mean to talk about the cost of ship-building, investment of cargoes, partnership for overseas adventure, and bottomry (a special maritime insurance design), etc. of the 16-18th century.

Lire la suite

Enquêter en Chine et en Russie :  A la recherche d’appuis communs pour la réflexion

Journée(s) d'étude - Mardi 13 mars 2018 - 09:00Une journée d’études consacrée aux «  Formes de présence du passé » en Chine et en Russie est organisée à l’EHESS, le mardi 13 mars 2018.OrganisationFrançoise Daucé (EHESS) et Isabelle Thireau (EHESS)ProgrammeEnquêter en Chine et en Russie : A la recherche d’appuis communs pour la réflexion. Journée 2 : «  Formes de présence du passé » - 13 mars 2018.  EHESS (salle 8), 105 bd Raspail, 75 006 Paris. 9h00 : Accueil et propos introductif 9h15-12h15 : Rendre publics les récits du passé Modératrice : Françoise Sabban (Directrice d'études, EHESS) Luba Jurgenson (Professeur, Sorbonne-Universités)Témoignages littéraires du Goulag. Sebastian Veg (Directeur d'études, EHESS)La réflexion sur l’époque maoïste: du récit victimaire des élites à la mémoire des subalternes 10h45 - 11h00 : Pause Bella Ostromooukhova (Maîtresse de conférences, Sorbonne-Universités)Présences du passé soviétique dans la littérature russe actuelle : enjeux éditoriaux, politiques et humains Discussion générale 12h15-14h00 : Déjeuner 14h00 -  17h30 : Donner à voir l'histoire et en débattre Modératrice : Elisabeth Claverie (Directrice de recherches, CNRS) Judith Pernin (Docteur associée, CEFC).Filmer des témoignages et mettre en scène l'histoire non officielle dans le documentaire indépendant chinois Irina Tcherneva (Chercheuse rattachée au CERCEC)Pratiques du récit historique dans le documentaire soviétique : rôle du témoignage et des archives visuelles (1957-1972) 16h00 - 16h15 : Pause Isabelle Thireau (Directrice d'études, EHESS)Où se souvenir ensemble de la place Shengli? Discussion générale  

Lire la suite

Small Words, Weighty Matters: Gossip, Knowledge and Libel in Early Republican China, 1916-1928

Conférence - Lundi 05 février 2018 - 17:00Dans le cadre de l’axe de recherche Des sociétés face aux États et du projet ANR  ChinaSpheres : les sphères publiques alternatives en Chine au 20e siècle, Jing Zhang, post-doctorante au Centre Chine Corée Japon présentera une conférence intitulée : "Small Words, Weighty Matters: Gossip, Knowledge and Libel in Early Republican China, 1916-1928". AbstractIn the years following the death of the autocratic ruler Yuan Shikai (1859-1916), the flow of gossip surrounding political leaders in China’s urban spheres revealed an open, disorderly yet robust arena full of competing voices, agendas, and manipulations . My dissertation examines gossip as both a new body of public political knowledge and a means of popular participation in this politically-fragmented and transitional era. On the one hand, this body of political knowledge engaged a wide spectrum of Chinese society engaged with this body of political knowledge, and which fostered an uncontrolled playful citizenship in China’s urban spaces. On the other hand, this new civic participation prompted the fledgling Republican state to curb the dissemination of information through censorship, legal avenues and political prapaganda. I argue that political gossip played a constructive role in forming a participatory political culture, in developing state mechanisms to discipline popular knowledge, and in shaping legal categories of defamation. As opposed to other studies that analyze the formation of Chinese citizenship in the process of nation-building, my project contextualizes the popular political participation in the Republican era within a broader shift in political culture that was increasingly shaped by the entertainment media. Lower- class information traders and a commoner audience dominated in the gossip economy by actively producing and consuming narratives and opinions, without being too much restricted by state education and elite activism. About the speakerJing Zhang recently joined the CNRS as a postdoctoral researcher for the project “Alternative Public Spheres in 20th century China”. From 2010 to 2017, she studied Modern Chinese History in the Ph.D Program at the Department of East Asian Languages and Culture, Columbia University. Previously, she received an M.A degree in Chinese History from the Department of Chinese Studies in National University of Singapore and B.A in Chinese Literature from Peking University, China. Her research interest lies in Chinese urban society, communication history, legal history, popular culture of East Asian countries, etc. She is working on the early Republican, in particular the warlord period (1916-1928), popular political engagement through the channels of gossip and rumor about political leaders and various state coping strategies in a highly commercialized urban context.La séance, ouverte à tous, aura lieu en anglais.

Lire la suite

Small Words, Weighty Matters: Gossip, Knowledge and Libel in Early Republican China, 1916-1928

Conférence - Lundi 05 février 2018 - 17:00Dans le cadre de l’axe de recherche Des sociétés face aux États et du projet ANR  ChinaSpheres : les sphères publiques alternatives en Chine au 20e siècle, Jing Zhang, post-doctorante au Centre Chine Corée Japon présentera une conférence intitulée : "Small Words, Weighty Matters: Gossip, Knowledge and Libel in Early Republican China, 1916-1928". AbstractIn the years following the death of the autocratic ruler Yuan Shikai (1859-1916), the flow of gossip surrounding political leaders in China’s urban spheres revealed an open, disorderly yet robust arena full of competing voices, agendas, and manipulations . My dissertation examines gossip as both a new body of public political knowledge and a means of popular participation in this politically-fragmented and transitional era. On the one hand, this body of political knowledge engaged a wide spectrum of Chinese society engaged with this body of political knowledge, and which fostered an uncontrolled playful citizenship in China’s urban spaces. On the other hand, this new civic participation prompted the fledgling Republican state to curb the dissemination of information through censorship, legal avenues and political prapaganda. I argue that political gossip played a constructive role in forming a participatory political culture, in developing state mechanisms to discipline popular knowledge, and in shaping legal categories of defamation. As opposed to other studies that analyze the formation of Chinese citizenship in the process of nation-building, my project contextualizes the popular political participation in the Republican era within a broader shift in political culture that was increasingly shaped by the entertainment media. Lower- class information traders and a commoner audience dominated in the gossip economy by actively producing and consuming narratives and opinions, without being too much restricted by state education and elite activism. About the speakerJing Zhang recently joined the CNRS as a postdoctoral researcher for the project “Alternative Public Spheres in 20th century China”. From 2010 to 2017, she studied Modern Chinese History in the Ph.D Program at the Department of East Asian Languages and Culture, Columbia University. Previously, she received an M.A degree in Chinese History from the Department of Chinese Studies in National University of Singapore and B.A in Chinese Literature from Peking University, China. Her research interest lies in Chinese urban society, communication history, legal history, popular culture of East Asian countries, etc. She is working on the early Republican, in particular the warlord period (1916-1928), popular political engagement through the channels of gossip and rumor about political leaders and various state coping strategies in a highly commercialized urban context.La séance, ouverte à tous, aura lieu en anglais.

Lire la suite

Les actualités

Japan’s Modern Castles: Reclaiming the Past and Proclaiming the Future

Conférence - Mercredi 13 juin 2018 - 11:00Le Centre de recherches sur le Japon accueillera Ran Zwigenberg, Professeur à l’Université de Pennsylvania State, pour une conférence exceptionnelle intitulée « Japan’s Modern Castles: Reclaiming the Past and Proclaiming the Future », avec la participation de Caroline Bodolec (CECMC-CCJ), discutante, le 13 juin 2018.Ran Zwigenberg est l'auteur de l'ouvrage Hiroshima: The Origins of Global Memory Culture (Cambridge University Press, 2014).Both home and abroad, Japan’s castles serve as prominent symbols of local, regional, and national identity. Castles occupy the center of most major Japanese cities and are universally recognizable as sites of heritage and as a link to the nation’s past. The current prominence of castles obscures their troubled modern history. After the restoration of 1868, castles, no longer of immediate military significance, became symbols of authority, on one hand, and of vaunted tradition on the other.  Castles were major sites of exhibitions, where they were often contrasted with Japan’s achievements in acquiring modern technology, serving as potent illustrations of Wakon-yōsai (Japanese spirit and Western technology). As the specific role castles played changed over time, they became sites of fierce contention. Particularly, castles were a major factor in the militarization of Japanese society before the Second World War and, after 1945, were important tools for demilitarizing Japan both physically and symbolically to turn it into a “nation of peace and culture.” This talk examines Japan’s castles from the late nineteenth century to the present to reconsider narratives of continuity and change in modern Japan; examining the changing role of castles in Japan’s troubled politics of history. 

Lire la suite

Minakai: An Ōmi Merchant’s Emporium at the Nexus of Imperial Asia and Immigrant America

Séance spéciale de séminaire - Jeudi 07 juin 2018 - 11:00Conférence de UCHIDA Jun, Professeure à l’Université de Stanford, professeure invitée à l'EHESS en juin 2018, dans le cadre du séminaire collectif du Centre Japon, le 7 juin 2018 (séance extraordinaire).The province of Ōmi (present-day Shiga prefecture) is historically known for its itinerant peddlers, the so-called Ōmi shōnin. Frequently compared to overseas Chinese and European Jews for their commercial prowess, merchants from Ōmi engaged in wholesale activities around early modern Japan, from Ezo (Hokkaidō) in the north to Kyūshū in the south. While they are almost a fixture in local and popular histories, Ōmi shōnin remain virtually unknown outside Japan. In this talk, I will offer an overview of their history, from their humble origins as peddlers to the peak of their activities in the Tokugawa period, when they circulated goods and commodities of various provinces to forge a trading diaspora across the early modern archipelago.

Lire la suite

Endô Shûsaku reads Frantz Fanon: Deimperialization Meets Decolonization

Conférence - Jeudi 17 mai 2018 - 11:00Conférence de Christopher L. HILL, Professeur à l'Université de Michigan, dans le cadre du séminaire collectif du Centre Japon, le 17 mai 2018.AbstractThe Japanese novelist Endô Shûsaku and the Martiniquan anticolonial theorist and activist Frantz Fanon each studied in Lyon in the early 1950s. Endô's stories and essays from the time show that he was reading the then-obscure Fanon closely. While it is unclear how Endô encountered Fanon, the use he made of Fanon's work shows them examining the collapse of empires from asymmetrical positions, with Fanon writing about the struggle against European colonialism and Endô about the de-imperialization of Japan by countries struggling to maintain control of their own imperium. The encounter between Endô and Fanon illustrates not only unexamined connections in the history of imperialism but also the possibility of creating new transnational histories that deepen our understanding of a heterogeneous, polycentric world.  

Lire la suite

Globe-Trotting and Nation-Building: A Sino-Japanese War Correspondent’s View, 1894-95

Conférence - Jeudi 03 mai 2018 - 12:00Catherine L. Phipps, Professeur à l’Université de Memphis, professeur invitée à l’EHESS au mois de mai 2018, donnera une conférence dans le cadre du séminaire collectif du Centre Japon le 3 mai 2018.Catherine L. Phipps est notamment l’auteur de l’ouvrage « Empires on the Waterfront: Japan’s Ports and Power, 1858-1899 » (Harvard University Asia Center, 2015).AbstractKawata Masazō lived an extraordinary life as an adventurer, a war correspondent, and perhaps a government spy in the late-nineteenth century. Kawata was able to move across the Pacific world—from Moji to the Ogasawara Islands, from the Arctic to the Americas, and from Korea to China to Siberia—with ease, finding employment as needed, meeting famous individuals, interviewing generals, fighting in and reporting on wars, and tapping into significant global events and phenomena. Through reports of his experiences, I examine two things. First, what Kawata’s globe-trotting can tell us about spatial, social, and economic mobility within two decades of the Meiji Restoration. Second, how Kawata understood his Japanese national identity in direct relation to the people and places he encountered. Further, since he believed in a progressive world order and supported revolutionary ideals and action to launch more democratic, modern societies, Kawata’s unusual life exposes the complexities of this formative era of globalization, nationalism, and imperialism.

Lire la suite

La discrimination à l’encontre des burakumin dans le Japon contemporain

Conférence - Jeudi 05 avril 2018 - 11:00Conférence de Caroline Taïeb (EHESS) dans le cadre du séminaire collectif du Centre de recherches sur le Japon, le 5 avril 2018.Depuis les années 1980, aucune recherche en français n’a été faite sur la discrimination à l’encontre des burakumin qui perdure aujourd’hui encore au sein de la société japonaise. Toutefois, même si elle reste relativement méconnue, plusieurs sociologues français y font référence dans leurs travaux. Car, bien que cette discrimination puise son origine dans l’histoire du Japon, les mécanismes d’exclusion et de ségrégation qu’elle mobilise sont semblables à ceux existant vis-à-vis d’autres groupes minoritaires.À travers les résultats d’une enquête quantitative et de deux enquêtes qualitatives menées auprès des non-burakumin et des burakumin au Japon entre 2012-2014 et 2015-2017, nous expliquerons les raisons qui conduisent la discrimination à se maintenir. C’est pourquoi, cette intervention s’articulera autour de deux thèmes : la discrimination dans le mariage, qui reste l’une des expressions les plus tenaces de ce rejet de l’autre malgré les mesures mises en place par le gouvernement japonais. Puis dans un second temps, nous verrons quelles sont les représentations des non-burakumin à l’encontre des burakumin qui contribuent à renforcer les frontières entre les deux groupes. Ainsi, cela nous permettra de comprendre comment l’évitement des buraku et de ses habitants se perpétue de façon insidieuse malgré l’abolition, depuis plus de 150 ans, d’un système statutaire mis en place durant l’époque d’Edo (1600-1868).  

Lire la suite

Les vassaux de la ville de Hagi

Conférence - Jeudi 01 mars 2018 - 11:00Morishita Tôru, Professeur à l'Université de Yamaguchi, donnera une conférence dans le cadre du sémainire collectif du Centre de recherches sur le Japon le 1er mars 2018. Cette conférence aura lieu en japonais avec traduction.M. Morishita est un spécialiste de l'histoire sociale du Japon des Tokugawa, et l'un des auteurs du dossier "Mibun". Penser les statuts sociaux du Japon prémoderne d'un numéro récent de la revue Histoire, Economie & Société.Les cités castrales (jôkamachi), qui constituaient l’armature urbaine du Japon de l’époque d’Edo, furent conçues pour rassembler les vassaux au pied du château de leur seigneur. Une grande partie de la superficie de la ville de Hagi, dont le site avait été d’ailleurs choisi pour des motifs militaires, était donc occupée par des demeures de guerriers, même si dès l’origine, tous ne purent pas être dotés de terrain par leur seigneur. La cité de Hagi reflétait donc dans son espace même, l’organisation vassalique de la maison seigneuriale des Môri et ses évolutions. Nous montrerons que tout en reprenant la structure générale des cités castrales, cette ville recelait aussi quelques particularités, comme la possibilité pour les guerriers de vendre leurs terrains, et que l’analyse des modes d’habitat nous en apprend aussi beaucoup sur les changements qui affectèrent la condition guerrière. 

Lire la suite

La socialisation à l'amour et à la sexualité chez les écoliers japonais

Conférence - Jeudi 15 février 2018 - 11:00Conférence d'Aline Henninger (INALCO/CEJ) dans le cadre du séminaire collectif du Centre de recherches sur le Japon, le 15 février 2018.Malgré les travaux récents de différents sociologues japonais ou les études nationales de l’Association japonaises pour la recherche sur l’éducation sexuelle (JASE) les enquêtes qualitatives sur la socialisation à la sexualité des jeunes enfants et préadolescents demeurent rares. Les protocoles d’enquêtes utilisés lors de mon travail de doctorat portant sur la socialisation de genre à l’école élémentaire au Japon apportent plusieurs données actualisées sur ce sujet précis. Lors d’un travail de terrain de 5 mois dans quatre écoles (d’octobre 2013 à juin 2014), j’ai préféré considérer l’observation participante comme réellement participante, comme la pratiquent et la conseillent notamment les anthropologues anglo-saxons spécialistes de l’enfance. De ce fait, lors des entretiens et lors du terrain, les écoliers ont évoqué eux-mêmes les moments où ils sont confrontés pour la première fois à l’amour et à la sexualité.L’objectif de cette présentation est de comprendre comment les représentations genrées, androcentrées et hétéronormées se produisent, et par quels processus les enfants les intériorisent. Autrement dit, comment les écoliers japonais se représentent et vivent la sexualité (comprise au sens large, de l’affectivité à l’amour, et de l’éducation sexuelle à la sexualité génitale) ? Pourquoi la sexualité constitue un enjeu pour les écoliers japonais ? Comment le marquage précoce des normes consacre l’hétérosexualité comme un régime de genre obligatoire ? Quel est le rôle des groupes de pairs lors de la socialisation à l’amour et à la sexualité ?Je montrerai dans quelle mesure le rôle des pairs et des médias sont déterminants pour cette socialisation. D’une part, toute tentative de transgression des normes touchant à la sexualité est fortement critiquée par les enfants, qui s’érigent comme les gardiens de l’ordre moral. Cette participation active des enfants dans l’imposition de l’unique hétérosexualité est d’autant plus remarquable que ces derniers déconstruisent sans cesse et rejettent également les normes de genre dans les autres domaines de la socialisation de genre. D’autre part, les représentations de la sexualité sont tributaires de celles de l’homosexualité, notamment masculine. Les images et les représentations caricaturales des personnes queer à la télévision influencent énormément les représentations de l’homosexualité chez les écoliers, qui en viennent à associer une apparence féminine à une virilité défaillante, alors synonyme d’homosexualité masculine, repoussoir ultime des représentations d’une (hétéro)sexualité « normale ».

Lire la suite

Faire carrière dans la presse quotidienne japonaise, un regard sociologique

Conférence - Jeudi 01 février 2018 - 11:00Conférence de César CASTELLVI (EHESS / Paris-Diderot) dans le cadre du séminaire collectif du Centre Japon, le 1er février 2018.Au regard des bouleversements que connait l’industrie de la presse en France ou aux États-Unis, la situation des entreprises de presse japonaises peut paraitre enviable. La presse quotidienne a jusqu’à présent été quasiment épargnée par les faillites de journaux et les licenciements massifs de reporters. Pour l’instant, la structuration de cette activité professionnelle autour d’une logique d’entreprise forte a réussi à protéger ses principaux acteurs d’une crise dont les nuages se font pourtant de plus en plus menaçants.Un regard plus fin sur le cheminement des carrières des reporters et sur les pratiques au travail révèle pourtant que le modèle du reporter salarié a changé depuis ces vingt dernières années. Ces changements trouvent leur origine dans les deux mouvements que sont le déclin du lectorat et les transformations qu’a connu le marché du travail japonais depuis le milieu des années 1990.Les conséquences de ces deux mouvements sur le recrutement, la formation et la mobilité professionnelle, ainsi que sur certaines pratiques éditoriales, sont aux cœurs de notre travail de thèse dont nous présenterons les principaux résultats.A partir de matériaux provenant d’observations et d’entretiens menés lors d’une enquête de terrain au Japon entre 2013 et 2016, cette communication se déroulera en trois temps : On commencera par décrire la logique organisationnelle qui structure le journalisme de presse. Ensuite, on mettra en avant la manière dont cette logique a évolué en se focalisant sur deux objets : la généralisation de la visibilité par l’intermédiaire de la signature des journalistes et le déclin du prestige d’un segment professionnel particulier, les fait-diversiers chargés de couvrir les affaires criminelles. 

Lire la suite

Rendez-vous du Japon contemporain de l’EHESS

Rencontre - Vendredi 19 janvier 2018 - 14:00À partir de 2018, le Centre de recherches sur le Japon propose une série de rencontres mensuelles dont le but est d'explorer les enjeux du renouvellement de la recherche sur le Japon contemporain. L’objectif est de faire connaitre les dynamiques intellectuelles qui participent à la reconfiguration du champ des études sur ce pays.Dans sa première édition, cette initiative est vue comme un lieu de présentation de travaux en cours réalisés par la nouvelle génération des chercheurs travaillant sur le Japon à l’EHESS. Elle a pour vocation à devenir un moment de débat sur les aspects méthodologiques et théoriques pour contribuer à une meilleure compréhension de l’expérience nippone et, au-delà, à l’avancement des sciences sociales autour des questions du rapport de la société au projet de la modernité, de l'expérience de la rupture historique, du déclin économique, de la crise environnementale, et de l'expérience post-industrielle.Ces rencontres ont également pour ambition d’être un lieu de sociabilité et d’échanges transdisciplinaires (histoire contemporaine, sociologie et anthropologie), permettant en outre le déploiement de démarches critiques autour des formes de normativité et de spécificité de la société moderne japonaise dans un contexte global. La recherche au CRJ s’efforce d’être à la hauteur de ce défi qui réclame aujourd’hui de nouveaux investissements intellectuels.Les séances s’adressent aussi bien aux spécialistes de l’Asie qu’aux chercheurs travaillant sur des sujets similaires dans d’autres aires géographiques et intéressés par la situation japonaise dans une perspective comparative.Programme19 janvier TOKUMITSU Naoko : « Prévenir l’insécurité : entre surveillance du quartier et quête de reconnaissance des acteurs sociaux »16 février NISHII Akane : « L’art et la surveillance de l’achat des étrangers, 1859-1861 »16 mars INOUE Masatoshi : « Histoire contemporaine de l’exportation des centrales nucléaires du Japon, 2000-2016 »18 mai CASTELLVI César : « Être membre du club : comment les reporters de presse japonais ont fermé leur marché du travail »15 juin NOSAKA Shiori : « Laboratoire d’une modernisation : l’histoire de la bactériologie médicale au Japon, 1880-1931 »

Lire la suite

Les actualités

Genre et nations partitionnées

Colloque - Jeudi 14 décembre 2017 - 09:15Les colloque international "Genre et nations partitionnées" est organisé par Anne Castaing (CNRS/CEIAS) et Benjamin Joinau (Hongik University/CRC)La « communauté imaginée » qu’est la nation mobilise les symboles les plus archétypaux pour se représenter dans les arts et les médias populaires et ces symboles sont le plus souvent genrés – que l’on pense à la Marianne de la jeune République française. En plus d’être l’écho du genre grammatical des valeurs de cette république dont elle est l’allégorie, Marianne est la figure de l’Alma Mater, à la fois nourricière et protectrice, qualités essentielles d’un Etat-nation ou d’un régime politique. Mais comment se pense une nation divisée politiquement par une partition ?Allemagne, Inde-Pakistan-Bangladesh, Irlande, Corée, Vietnam, Israël-Palestine, Yougoslavie – les cas de figure sont divers, couvrant jusqu’aux décolonisations, mais montrent que la partition renvoie spontanément à des représentations polarisées autour de relations genrées et hiérarchisées. De manière allégorique, celle-ci peut prendre la figure du frère et de la sœur, de la mère et du fils, même si le plus souvent, l’image du couple marié ou amoureux cherchant à se réunir est prédominante. Cependant, le binôme à (ré)apparier n’est pas le seul mode de symbolisation genrée de la division nationale. La partition, en tant que processus même, génère des violences, qui sont fondamentalement structurantes des rapports homme-femme aussi bien au niveau des pratiques que des représentations. En particulier, les femmes, porteuses et garantes de l’identité ethnique, sont couramment l’objet de violences sexuelles. Le viol, l’humiliation, la souffrance, le deuil (mari, enfants) infligés aux femmes et aux hommes en situation de partition en font le symbole non plus seulement d’une partie, mais du tout de la Nation divisée. Les femmes sont ainsi souvent investies d’un enjeu symbolique où se jouent, en plus des identités genrées, les identités collectives et leurs représentations. Ces dernières sont rarement monolithiques et font elles-mêmes l’objet de combinaisons variées et concurrentes, révélant la dynamique qui se joue au niveau de l’imaginaire d’une communauté quand elle est confrontée à une division interne. Plus que des symboles isolés, ce sont des mises en récit complexes que nous devons appréhender dans leur diversité narrative.Ce sont ces processus de symbolisation narrative, à la fois anthropologiques et historiques, que nous souhaitons analyser à travers les productions culturelles de pays en situation de partition. Nous espérons ainsi, par cette approche comparative, repérer des invariants tout en proposant des typologies narratives où la différence genrée est requise, reproduite, peut-être transformée, afin de penser un autre type de différence, celle qui se cristallise quand une nation est divisée et séparée. Nous serons en particulier sensibles aux différentes formes de représentations en fonction de leurs modes de production (institutionnel, individuel), de leur diffusion et de leur réception, afin d’éviter la simple étude de contenu décontextualisée.Ce colloque interdisciplinaire et comparatiste, qui accueille spécialistes des littératures, des productions culturelles et de l’histoire des idées, historiens et anthropologues travaillant sur différentes aires culturelles et contextes historiques, vise à interroger les partitions et les divisions nationales d’un point de vue genré. Il s’intéressera particulièrement aux représentations comme témoin de ces assimilations imaginaires : littérature, cinéma, arts performatifs, arts plastiques seront les supports de nos réflexions. Comité scientifiqueCatherine Brun (Université Paris 3 – Sorbonne Nouvelle) ;Anne Castaing (CNRS) ; Claire Gallien (Université Paul-Valéry) ;Benjamin Joinau (Hongik University) ;Francine Muel-Dreyfus (EHESS) ;Gianfranco Rebucini (IIAC) ;Delphine Robic-Diaz (Université Paul-Valéry) ;Fabrice Virgili (CNRS).

Lire la suite

Genre et nations partitionnées

Colloque - Vendredi 15 décembre 2017 - 09:15Les colloque international "Genre et nations partitionnées" est organisé par Anne Castaing (CNRS/CEIAS) et Benjamin Joinau (Hongik University/CRC)La « communauté imaginée » qu’est la nation mobilise les symboles les plus archétypaux pour se représenter dans les arts et les médias populaires et ces symboles sont le plus souvent genrés – que l’on pense à la Marianne de la jeune République française. En plus d’être l’écho du genre grammatical des valeurs de cette république dont elle est l’allégorie, Marianne est la figure de l’Alma Mater, à la fois nourricière et protectrice, qualités essentielles d’un Etat-nation ou d’un régime politique. Mais comment se pense une nation divisée politiquement par une partition ?Allemagne, Inde-Pakistan-Bangladesh, Irlande, Corée, Vietnam, Israël-Palestine, Yougoslavie – les cas de figure sont divers, couvrant jusqu’aux décolonisations, mais montrent que la partition renvoie spontanément à des représentations polarisées autour de relations genrées et hiérarchisées. De manière allégorique, celle-ci peut prendre la figure du frère et de la sœur, de la mère et du fils, même si le plus souvent, l’image du couple marié ou amoureux cherchant à se réunir est prédominante. Cependant, le binôme à (ré)apparier n’est pas le seul mode de symbolisation genrée de la division nationale. La partition, en tant que processus même, génère des violences, qui sont fondamentalement structurantes des rapports homme-femme aussi bien au niveau des pratiques que des représentations. En particulier, les femmes, porteuses et garantes de l’identité ethnique, sont couramment l’objet de violences sexuelles. Le viol, l’humiliation, la souffrance, le deuil (mari, enfants) infligés aux femmes et aux hommes en situation de partition en font le symbole non plus seulement d’une partie, mais du tout de la Nation divisée. Les femmes sont ainsi souvent investies d’un enjeu symbolique où se jouent, en plus des identités genrées, les identités collectives et leurs représentations. Ces dernières sont rarement monolithiques et font elles-mêmes l’objet de combinaisons variées et concurrentes, révélant la dynamique qui se joue au niveau de l’imaginaire d’une communauté quand elle est confrontée à une division interne. Plus que des symboles isolés, ce sont des mises en récit complexes que nous devons appréhender dans leur diversité narrative.Ce sont ces processus de symbolisation narrative, à la fois anthropologiques et historiques, que nous souhaitons analyser à travers les productions culturelles de pays en situation de partition. Nous espérons ainsi, par cette approche comparative, repérer des invariants tout en proposant des typologies narratives où la différence genrée est requise, reproduite, peut-être transformée, afin de penser un autre type de différence, celle qui se cristallise quand une nation est divisée et séparée. Nous serons en particulier sensibles aux différentes formes de représentations en fonction de leurs modes de production (institutionnel, individuel), de leur diffusion et de leur réception, afin d’éviter la simple étude de contenu décontextualisée.Ce colloque interdisciplinaire et comparatiste, qui accueille spécialistes des littératures, des productions culturelles et de l’histoire des idées, historiens et anthropologues travaillant sur différentes aires culturelles et contextes historiques, vise à interroger les partitions et les divisions nationales d’un point de vue genré. Il s’intéressera particulièrement aux représentations comme témoin de ces assimilations imaginaires : littérature, cinéma, arts performatifs, arts plastiques seront les supports de nos réflexions. Comité scientifiqueCatherine Brun (Université Paris 3 – Sorbonne Nouvelle) ;Anne Castaing (CNRS) ; Claire Gallien (Université Paul-Valéry) ;Benjamin Joinau (Hongik University) ;Francine Muel-Dreyfus (EHESS) ;Gianfranco Rebucini (IIAC) ;Delphine Robic-Diaz (Université Paul-Valéry) ;Fabrice Virgili (CNRS).

Lire la suite

Approches trans-disciplinaires de la ville et de l'architecture, regards croisés franco-coréens

Colloque - Mardi 10 octobre 2017 - 09:00L'atelier "Approches trans-disciplinaires de la ville et de l'architecture, regards croisés franco-coréens" se déroulera le 10 octobre 2017 dans le cadre du projet CREAK (Pour une approche alternative et engagée des villes nord-coréennes), un projet collaboratif (EHESS-EFEO-ENS) financé par la Comue Paris Sciences et Lettres (PSL).Programme9h : Accueil des participants9h30-11h : Panel 1 (recherches en France)Modératrice : Pascale Nédélec (ENS)Valérie Gelézeau (EHESS) : Paysages urbains et sociétés dans les grandes métropoles d’Asie: des grands ensembles coréens aux espaces publics cambodgiensFrançoise Ged (CAPA) : Patrimoine, villes et paysages culturelsElisabeth Chabanol (EFEO) : Archéologie urbaine de la péninsule coréenne11h-11h30 : Pause café11h30-13h : Panel 2 (recherches en RPDC)Modératrice : Pauline Guinard (ENS)Song-il JONG (Université d’architecture de Pyongyang) : La fonction et la structure de la ville dans l’ère de l’économie intelligenteJong-hun KIM (Université d’architecture de Pyongyang) : L’application du BIM dans la gestion du cycle de vie des bâtimentsSong-hak RYU (Université d’architecture de Pyongyang) : L’intégration à la conception architecturale des spécificités acoustiques des halls de concert en éventail Le nombre de places est limité et l’entrée se fait sur inscription uniquement. Renseignements : centrecoree@ehess.fr

Lire la suite

A Modern Buddhist and Colonial Monument: Manufacturing the Great Head Temple T’aegosa in 1938 Downtown Seoul

Conférence - Vendredi 19 mai 2017 - 10:00Dans le cadre du séminaire pluridisciplinaire d’études coréennes, Hwansoo Kim (Duke University, professeur invité de l’EHESS) présente une conférence intitulée "A Modern Buddhist and Colonial Monument: Manufacturing the Great Head Temple T’aegosa in 1938 Downtown Seoul".This talk examines the tumultuous process leading up to the completion of the T’aegosa temple and how its construction encapsulated the decades-long endeavor of Korean Buddhist reformers to centralize, unify, and governmentalize Korean Buddhism. In this talk, I trace the history of Korean Buddhists’ struggles to reach this goal and analyze the complex internal and external factors that culminated in the temple’s construction, with its unveiling in 1938 closely followed by the establishment of the unified order of Korean Buddhism, Chogyejong, in 1941. I also analyze the historical debates among Buddhist leaders on how to articulate the institutional role of the temple, how to manufacture the symbolic significance of the building for Korean Buddhism, and how to relate the temple to the colonial government’s policy. I would ultimately like this talk to illuminate the ways in which, despite its colonial space, this architecture came to manifest a locus of Korean Buddhist modern, traditional, and national identity.

Lire la suite

Competing Transnational Buddhisms: Yu Guanbin’s Contribution to Taixu’s Buddha-ization Movement in 1920–30s Shanghai

Conférence - Vendredi 12 mai 2017 - 10:00Dans le cadre du séminaire pluridisciplinaire d’études coréennes, Hwansoo Kim (Duke University, professeur invité de l’EHESS) présente une conférence intitulée "Competing Transnational Buddhisms: Yu Guanbin’s Contribution to Taixu’s Buddha-ization Movement in 1920–30s Shanghai".This talk concerns the work of the prominent Korean lay-Buddhist and entrepreneur Yu Guanbin (1891–1933) in Shanghai during the mid-1920s and early-1930s. Yu collaborated with the Chinese Buddhist reformer Taixu (1890–1947) in order to promote a transnational Buddhist discourse called “The Buddha-ization Movement” (fohua yundong). Yu also acted as a bridge between Korean and Chinese Buddhism by undertaking the project of rebuilding an 11th-century Korean temple, Koryŏsa, in Hangzhou. In this talk, I examine how, due to the intersections and conflicts between national/transnational and religious/political visions, Yu’s engagement in these projects was a distinctive case of modern East Asian Buddhism.

Lire la suite

Building a Buddhist Empire: The Reprinting and Distribution of the Koryŏ Canon in and beyond Colonial Korea (1910-1945)

Conférence - Jeudi 11 mai 2017 - 14:00Dans le cadre de séminaire pluridisciplinaire d’études coréennes, Hwansoo Kim (Duke University, professeur invité de l’EHESS) présente une conférence intitulée " Building a Buddhist Empire: The Reprinting and Distribution of the Koryŏ Canon in and beyond Colonial Korea (1910-1945) ".In this talk, I will discuss the powerful political, religious, and diplomatic symbolism historically embodied by the material form of Buddhist Canons—like the Koryŏ Canon. The power of the Koryŏ Canon as an object is not unique to Canons generally nor to the modern period. I argue that the Canon’s powerful symbolism did not fade but rather intensified in the modern period. To understand the power of the Canon in the modern period, I will look at it through a transnational lens, examining its influence in both religious and ostensibly secular contexts. Reprints of the Koryŏ Canon, for example, were on permanent exhibit in museums for public viewing, and with the rise of Orientalist scholarship on Buddhism also gained prominence as objects of scholarly research. These more secular aspects of the colonial-era valorization of the Koryŏ Canon can best be seen in the two printing projects the colonial government implemented in 1915 and 1937, and in their effect on the understanding of the nature of the Canon. I will demonstrate that these projects, sponsored in response to the colonizing, nationalizing, and globalizing discourses on the Canon, further attest to the persistent importance of religion - manifested in a material form - for modernity, nationalism, and imperialism.

Lire la suite

A Buddhist Christmas: The Buddha’s Birthday Festival in Colonial Korea

Conférence - Vendredi 05 mai 2017 - 14:00Dans le cadre du séminaire pluridisciplinaire d’études coréennes, Hwansoo Kim (Duke University, professeur invité de l’EHESS) présente une conférence intitulée « A Buddhist Christmas: The Buddha’s Birthday Festival in Colonial Korea ».This talk examines the dynamic aspects of the Buddha’s Birthday festival as it was celebrated from 1928 to 1945 in colonial Korea. A joint Japanese and Korean Buddhist event sponsored by the state, it became the signature religious and state festival. Although much politicized, the festival was also a culmination of Buddhist efforts in Asia to respond to modernity, nationalism, colonialism, and Christian missions. Paralleling the reinvention of Christmas in the modern period, Buddhists reconfigured the Buddha’s birthday as a symbol of their religious identity and power. The Buddha’s Birthday festival should be understood in the context of increasing contact and exchange among Buddhists in the East and the West. The festival’s prominence was the result of complex negotiation and collaboration between Korean and Japanese Buddhists who both hoped the festival would advance their overlapping visions of Buddhism. The festival was not so much an imposition of the colonizer on a native culture as it was a dynamic, creative feature of modern Korean Buddhism in the colonial context.

Lire la suite

Desires in Colonial Memories: Kisaeng, Assassin and New Woman

Conférence - Vendredi 24 mars 2017 - 14:00Dans le cadre du séminaire pluridisciplinaire d’études coréennes, Hyaeweol Choi (Australian National University, professeur invité de l’EHESS) présente une conférence.Popular culture is a powerful channel for re-imagining the past. In this presentation, I specifically analyze two examples: Capital Scandal (Kyŏngsŏng scandal, 2007) and Assassination (Amsal, 2015), both set in 1930s colonial Korea, examining the interplay between two competing desires: the desire for the liberated modern self and the yearning for national independence. These desires ultimately converge in a homogenizing narrative about the nation, reinforcing the still pervasive sentiments of “affective nationalism” in contemporary Korea.

Lire la suite

The Experience of « House » and « Home » in Colonial Korea

Conférence - Vendredi 24 mars 2017 - 10:00Dans le cadre du séminaire pluridisciplinaire d’études coréennes, Hyaeweol Choi (Australian National University, professeur invité de l’EHESS, présente une conférence.In this presentation I trace the evolution of the idea and image of the “modern home” in late nineteenth and early twentieth century Korea with central focus on the role of the transpacific network. It focuses on the role that American Protestant missionaries, enlightenment-oriented social reformers and foreign-educated intellectuals played in fashioning the ideal home, which came to be reflected in images associated with the “missionary home,” the “home, sweet home” and “a doll’s house.”

Lire la suite

EHESS
CNRS

flux rss  Les actualités

Publicness beyond the public sphere

Colloque - Jeudi 21 juin 2018 - 09:00International conference organized by Columbia University and École des hautes études en sciences sociales. Supported by the Agence nationale de la recherche (project ChinaSpheres), PSL University, Weatherhead East Asia Institute, Columbia University. Present (...)(...)

Lire la suite

Plus d'actualités

flux rss  Les actualités

EnviroTech Histories of Modern East Asia

Journée(s) d'étude - Jeudi 14 juin 2018 - 09:30Workshop international organisé par Aleksandra Kobiljski (CRJ-CCJ/EHESS) et Delphine Spicq (CECMC-CCJ/EHESS) en collaboration avec Sara Pritchard (Cornell University), le 14 juin 2018 à l'EHESS. Workshop description Envirotech is a field of research (...)(...)

Lire la suite

Plus d'actualités

flux rss  Les actualités

Fonds Marcel Giuglaris

Focus sur une collection -Le Centre de recherche sur la Corée (CRC) a reçu en octobre 2012 un riche fonds documentaire rassemblé par Marcel Giuglaris (1922-2010), journaliste et correspondant de guerre en Asie orientale, qui a couvert l’actualité de cette région pendant près de quarante ans. Son (...)(...)

Lire la suite

Plus d'actualités

CECMC
Adresse : 190-198 avenue de France 75244 Paris, France
Tel : 33 (0)149 54 20 90
Fax : 33 (0)1 49 54 20 78
Site web : http://cecmc.ehess.fr/

CRC
Adresse : 22, avenue du Président Wilson, 75116 Paris, France
Tel/Fax : 33 (0)1 53 70 18 76
Site web : http://crc.ehess.fr/

CRJ
Adresse : 190-198 avenue de France 75244 Paris, France
Tél. : 33 (0)1 49 54 20 90
Adresse: 105 boulevard Raspail, 75006 Paris
Tél: 01 53 10 54 07
Site web : http://crj.ehess.fr/